Time, Speed, Modernity, Futurity

An evolving toolbox of non-Stieglerian resources, both popular exegeses and critical-theoretical responses, for thinking about speed and acceleration in relation to technology and economics.


On the popular literary front, Rebecca Solnit paraphrases many of the anxieties about the changing relation to time, while Jonathan Franzen takes more time over it, both in a manner that bears something in common with Stiegler – particular his concern about the loss of care and attention.

BBC Radio 3 Essay – At the Speed of Thought (5 parts)
Scott Lash presents the first episode on Zygmunt Bauman’s concept of ‘liquid modernity’ and the final episode on High Frequency Trading is also worth a listen.

The pre-history of HFT is also covered here – while an article in the science journal Nature (on ‘ultrafast extreme events’) about the increasing inability of humans to intervene in such activity in ‘real-time’ can be found here.

Philip Mirowski on neoliberalism.

Richard Barbrook’s infamous anti-Wired critique of ‘dotcom neoliberalism’ in The Californian Ideology.

This post on the gamification as means of accelerating the processing of surveillance data, hilariously by a PhD researcher in a ‘Dept of Political Economy and Alternative Futures’.

Moving more towards some examples of critical theory/philosophy dealing with time and the speed of modernity (in chronological order):

Lewis Mumford – Technics and Civilization (1934)

Jacques Ellul – The Technological Society (1954)

Langdon Winner – Autonomous Technology: Technics-out-of-control as a Theme in Political Thought (1977)

Bruno Latour – We Have Never Been Modern (1991)

Peter Osborne – The Politics of Time: Modernity and Avant-Garde (1995)

Antonio Negri – Time for Revolution (1997)

Louis Armand and Arthur Bradley (eds) – Technicity (2006)

Yann Moulier-Boutang – Cognitive Capitalism (2007)

Franco ‘Bifo’ Berardi – The Soul at Work (2009) / After the Future (2011)

David Bennett (ed.) – Loaded Subjects: Psychoanalysis, Money, and the Global Financial Crisis (2011)

Arthur Bradley – Originary Technicity: The Theory of Technology from Marx to Derrida (2011)

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